Andy Anderson

Providing CFO services and Business Transition Services in Southern California

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About Andy

Andy Anderson

Chino Hills, CA CFO

33 Years of Experience

Direct Contact

andyanderson@b2bcfo.com

office 909-732-4917

Universities:

University of Utah

Certificates & Licenses:

CPA,Logistics Executive Development - Univ Tennessee

Organizations:

CalCPA

Contact Andy Anderson and receive a free Discovery Analysis™

  • A confidential meeting with the business owner(s), then interview company staff.
  • Look at the company’s financial information and computer systems.
  • Benchmark financial information against industry averages.
  • Create a confidential report of our findings in The Strategy Gameplan™







Andy’s Bio

Andy, a native of Utah, began his financial background while studying accounting at the University of Utah. After graduating, he moved to Southern California and began his career at the then largest accounting firm, Arthur Andersen & Co. From Arthur Andersen, Andy moved on to work at companies such as: Foster Farms, Con-Way Western Express, and A-Z Bus Sales. Over the last 30+ years, 25 of which as the Chief Financial Officer, His career has spanned from working on small startup companies to very large companies with multiple locations and branches. He now specializes in assisting businesses to reach operating goals and improve profits.

Andy's expertise includes working with company leaders to identify key performance indicators (KPI) to monitor and improve to increase success. He has learned that working with key players to refine the information for those KPI metrics will help companies reach the goals they have always thought possible. Other areas of expertise include: GAAP, Strategy, Metrics, Budgeting, Cash Flow, ESOP, 401k, Forecasting, Captive Insurance, Operations, Cost Accounting, Insurance, Employee Benefits and Activity Based Costing.

Throughout the years, Andy has taken an active role in training managers and entrepreneurs to understand operating processes and connecting them to improve financial results. Andy focuses on monitoring operating metrics that support the financial numbers, provides pathways to process improvement and resulting in higher profits. This close training technique has resulted in lowering costs and increases profitability.

Andy is a CPA, Secretary of the Inland Empire Chapter of CalCPA and an Eagle Scout. He is a member of FENG (Financial Executive Networking Group) and is an active volunteer in his neighborhood community. Andy and Marlene, his wife of 38 years, reside in the Inland Empire of Southern California and they have four children and eight grandchildren.

Contact Andy (909) 732-4917

 

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Recent Articles

Jun 24Andy Anderson

Think You Have Your Troops in Tip, Top Shape?

Jun 24Andy Anderson

Working with a great insurance broker helps prepare your team to be business-ready.    You’ve reviewed your operations and made the appropriate procedural and safety changes.  You’ve updated your operations and employee manuals and seemingly have everything in place.  Well, now where do you go to get insurance? Finding a great broker is paramount in getting proper insurance coverage for your company. This is the last of a series of posts on insurance.  In previous posts, we’ve covered risk identification,

Jun 17Andy Anderson

Build the Fort to Protect Your Business

Jun 17Andy Anderson

Guard your organization from threats and dangers through improved business operations and proper insurance coverage. In previous posts, I’ve discussed how an insurance company’s job is to deny claims. To protect you from those denied claims, I provided you with a chart to help you identify and stratify risks to make sure you get the appropriate coverage to minimize business threats.  For this one, let’s talk about building your company fort to protect your business. In this series of posts,

Jun 10Andy Anderson

Lions, Tigers and Bears, Oh My!

Jun 10Andy Anderson

What danger is lurking in your business backyard? How in the world can you ever anticipate all of the things that can go wrong?  How do you identify the risks that would impact your business and which coverage you need to protect your assets and your ability to run your operation?  And then how much should you pay for the coverage? This is a continuation of my series of 4 blog posts discussing insurance needs.  In my last blog post,

Jun 3Andy Anderson

What Do Insurance Companies Do Best? Deny Claims!

Jun 3Andy Anderson

  Or so it seems when trying to file a claim for your business. There is nothing that will give you a bigger “pit in your stomach” feeling than calling your insurance agent, explaining a loss and having the agent reply, “Well, that’s not covered!” In this series of 4 posts I’ll be talking about insurance coverage and mitigating risk for your business.  I’ll cover the different types of risk and what makes an insurance broker good or great. And

May 27Andy Anderson

It’s My Party – And I’m be the Best Host Ever!

May 27Andy Anderson

If you’re not the ringmaster of this circus then someone else will be! So you’ve determined when you want to transition out of the business, what form the transition will take — sale, transfer to employees, management buyout– and now you need to make it happen. I’ve covered potholes, why you need a Success TeamTM and the preparation needed to sell your company.  Now it is time to manage your performers. How do I use the Success TeamTM So now

May 20Andy Anderson

Make Your Dream Team a Success TeamTM

May 20Andy Anderson

Making the Most of Exceptional Talent So you have your team of experts assembled to help in the sale of your business.  Now how do you use them to achieve the highest level of success possible? In previous posts I’ve covered some of the potholes owners hit during a business sale or transition.  I’ve also listed the advisors you should have on your team. As good of a business owner and CEO you may be, sometimes it truly takes a

May 13Andy Anderson

Already Swimming Hard Upstream Just Running Your Business?

May 13Andy Anderson

By Andy Anderson Sometimes it’s all you can do to keep the business afloat. Now on top of it, let me throw you a 100 lb. weight of uncertainty. I’ve covered what too many business owners discover only after the business has been sold.  In this one I cover what group of advisors you need and why. While entrenched in the day-to-day operations, it is sometimes difficult to lift your head out of the water long enough to see the

May 6Andy Anderson

Congratulations on Selling Your Business!

May 6Andy Anderson

Congratulations on Selling Your Business! Now get back to work! After you’ve sold your business, during the “fun” years, you make a shocking discovery.  You are short of cash.  So, back to work you go, hi ho, hi ho.  Not what you planned.  This is not an uncommon experience.  How do you make sure it doesn’t happen to you? This is the first of a series of blog posts about the team you need to successfully sell your business for

Apr 29Andy Anderson

What’s all This Blogging Stuff?

Apr 29Andy Anderson

What’s all this blogging stuff?       If a tree falls in the forest, how will a CPA record it?   What have I been doing?  It’s a fair question I’ve been focused on maintaining a blog, of sorts.  I find my clients aren’t unique, but they are experiencing common problems.  They need some reminders of things they can do that will increase their company’s success.  So, as a summary, below are some brief summaries of what’s been on my mind. SWOT

Apr 22Andy Anderson

Bankers Need Constant Care and Feeding

Apr 22Andy Anderson

Keep your banker in the loop on new product developments, revenue forecasts and improvements in market share to keep them a champion of your business. This is the last post in a 4-part series covering the business owners need for a loan to cover short-term cash flow needs. To read the whole series in order, visit my blog. I’ve covered the importance of meeting with your banker and giving them an overview from time to time not only in case

Apr 15Andy Anderson

Preparing the Bank to Help Your Business Finances

Apr 15Andy Anderson

Lose the entitlement thinking of being a good, long-term customer and make the case for your business’ viability and the return on investment to the bank to get your loan.  I’ve covered a novice business owner’s trip to their bank to initiate a discussion on getting a loan and the point-of-view of the banker in response to your request for a loan in this series. Now I want to share how you can prepare your pitch for a loan. Your

Apr 8Andy Anderson

I’m Just Asking for a Short-term Business Loan — Why All the Questions?

Apr 8Andy Anderson

Sometimes trying to get a loan to smooth out your cash flow feels like an interrogation when you aren’t prepared to handle the questions posed by your banker. I’ve covered a typical, unprepared business owner’s trip to their bank to initiate a discussion on getting a loan in our first post  in this series. Now I want to share the banker’s perspective on lending money. Your banker is making an investment in your business. When you first started your business what

Apr 1Andy Anderson

Does “Despicable Me” Describe Your Banker?

Apr 1Andy Anderson

It does if you repeatedly accept commercial banking mysterious service or worse, allowed absentee accounting turn your banking relationship to “friendship” status. I will be covering a 4-part series of articles about how to successfully make the business owner’s request for a loan from their banker—the expectations, misconceptions and revelations of the whole process. Imagine you are in your office, looking over your cash needs and suddenly realize that your cash needs exceed your cash availability.  What do you do? 

Mar 25Andy Anderson

I Can’t Afford a CFO – Throw that $ Away To Save the ¢

Mar 25Andy Anderson

I Can’t Afford a CFO – Throw that $ Away To Save the ¢   What is your highest value to your company?  You had the initial idea, you spent the time to build the business, and you are the one who got the company to where it is today.  All the result of your hard work.   So now where should you spend your time to generate the most value?  Paying bills, preparing invoices, pouring over financial statements?  Is it

Mar 18Andy Anderson

So You’re the President

Mar 18Andy Anderson

So You’re the President AND You have a CFO So What Exactly do You Do Everyday?   The CFO is an orchestra leader of resources.  As your advisor he knows when to bring in the insurance agent, the banker, the CPA.  Are you an expert in all of areas?  Of course not.  An experienced CFO has had experience in these areas and when decisions need to be made. The CFO effectively utilizes necessary resources for growth and profitability.  So what

Mar 11Andy Anderson

A CPA and CFO Really Aren’t the Same People!

Mar 11Andy Anderson

A CPA and CFO Really Aren’t the Same People! Or Just Because It Smells as Sweet Doesn’t Mean It’s a Rose Many other articles compare a CFO and CPA.  A CFO does this and a CPA does not; a CPA does this and a CFO does not.  Which is better is not the question.  The question is why do successful companies have both. A CFO Has 2 Major Responsibilities A CFO is an integral advisor to help you, the business

Mar 4Andy Anderson

CPA vs. CFO, What’s the Real Difference?

Mar 4Andy Anderson

  CPA vs. CFO, What’s the Real Difference? Different initials, but same position, right?  WRONG!   There are lots of ideas of which advisors are needed to be successful in business.  Ask your friends, colleagues, family members and anyone else who will talk to you about your business and they will tell you need the following two advisors: Certified Public Accountant (CPA) – To help you keep you out of trouble with the IRS and state taxing authority Attorney –

Feb 25Andy Anderson

SWOT’s Done, Now What?

Feb 25Andy Anderson

SWOT’s Done, Now What? 6 follow-up strategies to keep the dust of your SWOT Analysis and get actionable results After all the congratulatory “jobs well-done” are said and the pats on the back are handed out for completing the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) Analysis, be sure you put into motion your next steps. Unfortunately many companies put it on the shelf so they can look at it, show everyone they’ve done it and say “what a good boy

Feb 18Andy Anderson

16 SWOT Analysis Conversation Starters

Feb 18Andy Anderson

16 SWOT Analysis Conversation Starters Stimulate thinking and participation in your SWOT Analysis discussion So you’ve determined that a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) Analysis is a good idea.  You’ve set a date, you’ve invited the participants.  This may be the first one you’ve done.  So how do you get started? Get participants thinking beforehand by sending out a list of questions and ask them to come up with as many answers to the questions as they can.  If

Feb 11Andy Anderson

Re-Think Your SWOT Analysis –OR–SWOT Your SWOT Analysis

Feb 11Andy Anderson

Re-Think Your SWOT Analysis –OR–SWOT Your SWOT Analysis Re-thinking the WHOs, WHENs and HOWs of doing a successful SWOT Analysis Part of any successful analysis is to clear away any bias or pre-conceived notions you may have.  The same is true when performing a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) analysis. Here are answers to three questions I frequently get asked: When should a SWOT Analysis be done? It should be done periodically.  I say “periodically” because I don’t think

Feb 4Andy Anderson

SWOT This, New Year, New Review

Feb 4Andy Anderson

SWOT This, New Year, New Review Compelling reasons to take a second look at this important business planning tool SWOT.  I know, I know. Many business leaders have heard of performing a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats analysis.  And I bring it up again.  Oftentimes we do it because someone suggested it—or even commanded it.  There are times we just want to check it off of our “to do” list and return to the real work of running our daily

Dec 14Andy Anderson

What are You Doing?

Dec 14Andy Anderson

Well we are entering the last two weeks of 2013.  For many retail companies this will be the busiest two weeks of the year.  Before Christmas retail companies will be busy with sales and customers making the final requests (demands) for the year.  After Christmas, there will be a lot of transactions, but many of those will be returns and exchanges.  For non-retail business, this time of year usually signals a natural slowdown of business activity.  Some businesses close the

Nov 30Andy Anderson

Will 2013 be a Banner Year in the Inland Empire?

Nov 30Andy Anderson

Now that the election is over there is no end to the pundit’s comments about what the next four years are going to look like.  Several clients are reviewing their yearend tax strategy and taking advantage of the currently lower capital gains.  I’ve had discussions with other financial professionals that they have small business owners that have decided to sell their business and want the deal closed before the end of the year.  It’s like the election built a fire

Oct 29Andy Anderson

“Taxmageddon”

Oct 29Andy Anderson

What’s going to happen in January if Congress doesn’t act on the tax changes scheduled in January.  Among the articles being published I received what I thought was a quick summary.  The link is: http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=jty6r9dab&v=001Jh0o9o-zSlIECf8Go0bV81ufjhwRAxsNdn3g1eeTb79cCFk_yR06FiQ3WoNHFdMpjfZpZZVN4lxoa3ZhgvQZiNqDyaBeoASIZmeF2k8F6YhBYy1WJzJGyNM9-tnK8T5UnycR9ufO9Sk%3D If Congress doesn’t act 9 of 10 Americans would see an average  increase $3,500.   For the middle income household, the one the candidates are so passionate to protect, would increase by $2,000.  According to the article  The average federal tax rate would climb a whopping 5

Oct 17Andy Anderson

A Little Background

Oct 17Andy Anderson

In 1987 I moved to Chino Hills.  Back then the closest food outlet was the local golf course concession stand.  There was lot of open fields, cows and wildlife.  It was not unusual for our garbage to be raided by the local raccoon or possum.  Our kids were in the first graduating classes of the local schools, it was exciting to be on the ground level of many different things.  We were only one of many families moving in so